Author Topic: How accurate was Quadrophenia?  (Read 15625 times)

Smiler

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2013, 07:21:39 PM »
Actually I stand by my first statement including the clothing in Quadrophenia. Even looking through Richard Barnes Mods! book will show you that the average Mod in 64 wasn't much of a dresser. They also got in enough advice from original Mods such as Lloyd Johnson. In fact I know a few facts but they are in my own book so can't explain much more.

DJ Penny Lane

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2013, 05:14:57 PM »
I'm actually planning on doing a whole episode of Punks in Parkas about this soon. Three person discussion with me, and two revival era Mods who came into in the 80s. I saw Quad for the first time when I was 12 or 13, but didn't make any Mod connection to it. The only reason I watched it was that I liked the Police and found this odd movie that Sting was in, so wanted to see it. I also liked the Who then too, but didn't know much about Mod or any of that.

I discovered Mod late, when I was in University while Brit Pop was big. We had a pretty thriving scene here at that time and thats when I heard people talking about Quad, so pulled out my VHS tape and watched it again. We here in Winnipeg didn't take too much from it. Sure, we had Parkas, the guys wore suits, the girls dressed nice, but apart from that, we didn't take much from Quad.

I am curious, now that I'm older, just how accurate the movie was in catching the scene. I think there is always going to be difference in how Mod in the mid 1960s is relayed to us now. So many books, movies and now with the internet, it's easy to do some research and see that yes some might have looked like the did in Quad and some didn't.

Host of Punks in Parkas, a weekly Mod radio show broadcasting live from Winnipeg. Podcast available at www.punksinparkas.Podomatic.com and iTunes

Ian_B

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2013, 02:53:34 PM »
In fact I know a few facts but they are in my own book so can't explain much more.

Oh Paul .... you tease !!!!  ;)
Grammar = the difference between knowing your s**t, and knowing you're s**t!

Stax

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2013, 06:01:27 PM »
How big a budget did Quadrophenia have? I imagine not a very big one so corners would have to be cut. I assume the extras would just be told to turn up rather than all of them having an outfit made, hair done etc. Obviously accuracy would then be lost a bit.

Mambero

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2013, 09:37:31 AM »
3.27 (although that did go a long way in those days).

Apparently, a load of 70s mods from the north of England (the only place mods existed at the time) were hired as extras, then given haircuts and lent clothes.

tommc666

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2013, 09:59:57 AM »
as I understood it, at the time of filming, there were mods in London and some made it into the film but the vast majority were that were asked to be involved  were the scooter clubs of the time, mainly from the north - the flares and taches!.... as to them being mods, thats a matter of opinion that could probably take up a thread of its own

Stax

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2013, 11:30:51 AM »
The only thing that really annoys me about Quadrophenia is when they're panning along Madeira Drive where all the mods are when they first get to Brighton and there's a bloke they're who looks about 40 with long, straggly hair, flares, looking a bit of a mess. Somebody should've told him to go to the back.

Ian_B

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2013, 11:37:57 AM »
as I understood it, at the time of filming, there were mods in London and some made it into the film but the vast majority were that were asked to be involved  were the scooter clubs of the time, mainly from the north - the flares and taches!.... as to them being mods, thats a matter of opinion that could probably take up a thread of its own

That's about right, Tom

As a young lad in my late teens ... well OK then, early 20's ... & being local, I went down to watch the filming one weekend & ended up being an extra for 2 days!! They paid me slightly more than the going rate as I was "already in costume" ;)

Thoroughly enjoyed getting paid for running up & down the beach aimlessly for 2 days - but have never actually managed to spot myself, even with the advent of freeze frame on the DVD player - I fear my contribution to British Cinema ended up on the cutting room floor

Ian B
« Last Edit: April 03, 2013, 02:38:09 PM by Ian_B »
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Ian_B

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2013, 11:51:37 AM »
Just found this article & thought a few might find it interesting

Quadrophenia - Where The Clothes Came From
From Who Magazine No. 3, December 1979
Transcribed by Brian Cady

Contemporary Wardrobe is a clothes-hire firm that covers fashions over the last 30 years. It is run by two ex-mods, Roger Burton and Jack English, and one assignment of theirs was to do some of the costumes for the Quadrophenia film.

Jack English said, "Getting the costumes together was pure joy because we were part of the Mod era and our hearts are still there. We were at the actual Brighton riot portrayed in the film. Those were the days when a guy spent an hour getting the knot in his tie just right, afraid to sit down on the bus in case his suit got creased. There were only about 300 guys in the whole of London who could then afford authentic Mod suits, and for the film we located a wonderful genuine silk John Michael exclusive. The kid we hired it for jumped in the sea wearing it during the filming of the Brighton riot scene and it was a complete write-off. That beach fight sequence annihilated a lot of irreplaceable clothing. It made my heart bleed. Kids today can't comprehend what a silk suit symbolized to someone in 1964."

Roger opens a battered box and out spills 30 years of brassiere push-up and under-wired. He examines a satin number with conical cups. "For Quadrophenia we had to research the right shape. Mod girls were moving away from padding and preferred push-up breasts with blunted-looking ends." Authentic underwear is essential to capture the rhythms of an epoch, and Roger objects to females in Quadrophenia wearing tights. "They should be in stockings because women wearing suspenders walked, sat and danced quite differently."

And Jack has one final comment about the film: "When we needed parkas for the scooter boys in 'Quadrophenia' people asked why we simply didn't get them from C&A." He lifts a parka resembling a heap of old rag from the floor: "Feel the genuine army surplus article with fishtail back and fur hood. There's only about twenty of these left in the country, double zips, clips, wool-blanket lining. The modern synthetic versions look stiff and hang all wrong."

« Last Edit: April 03, 2013, 11:58:19 AM by Ian_B »
Grammar = the difference between knowing your s**t, and knowing you're s**t!

Mambero

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Re: How accurate was Quadrophenia?
« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2013, 02:19:28 PM »
as I understood it, at the time of filming, there were mods in London and some made it into the film but the vast majority were that were asked to be involved  were the scooter clubs of the time, mainly from the north - the flares and taches!.... as to them being mods, thats a matter of opinion that could probably take up a thread of its own

True, however afaik, in those days scooterists had yet to come up with their own name and identity, so anyone who was in a scooter club considered themselves a mod.  (I'm only going on what I've read, or possibly imagined, so anyone is welcome to correct me.)

On a separate note, a mate of mine recently informed me that he has noticed a load of old scooterists, who used to hate mods, now wearing suits etc made by the likes of BS and Lambretta, and spending their time watching Jam tribute bands etc.  Presumably they are too old to spend their weekends camping and living in combats.  (Whether they have discarded the far right connection I cannot say.)
« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 02:41:12 PM by Mambero »