Author Topic: RSG  (Read 2062 times)

Chilli

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Re: RSG
« Reply #30 on: September 25, 2020, 08:02:03 AM »
Just got my hands on it. First impression: heavy!  ;D


Gyms still closed in Spain?

Nae excuse - get liftin' the book.

I think I'll read it first, Laird, it also looks quite interesting  :)

This is another recent purchase that I've not got round to looking through yet, though it will have to join the queue behind the Stuart Cosgrove trilogy of soul-related books; Detroit 67, Memphis 68 and Harlem 69 which are waiting patiently on the bookshelf waiting to be read. 

Anyone read these; I'm hoping they're worth it, though they have had good reviews whenever I've seen any.

I've read the Detroit book, Chilli, and I have to say it lived up to expectations: a wonderful, thorough research work blended with an articulate narrative, which is the standard essays should aim to, IMO.

As you should expect, it's heavy on Motown but provides also a lot of context about the Motor City and the era, including the involvement of John Sinclair's White Panthers Party with black nationalist groups and the civil right struggles. In fact, I'm planning to read the rest of the trilogy some day soon.

As for the RSG tome, after savouring it for a couple of hours, I think the cover's claims to be the "definitive story" are quite accurate, with attention to detail very much to the fore (Andy Neill conducted literally hundreds of interviews during the 17 years that it took to ready -no pun intended- the book, and it shows), loads of great pictures of the show and its contributors, even pieces about the show by frequent guests as Mick Jagger. Probably the book of the year for people of our persuassion.

Thanks for your succinct summary of both books Rafa; as always, very helpful.

I seem to have been on a bit of buying binge this year and managed to read two of Tony Beesley's books over the summer; Sawdust Caesars and Mojo Talkin', both of which are fairly hefty reads.  The downside now is finding the time to fit in reading time for everything else, though I'm definitely going to prioritise the Cosgrove trilogy as I've had these the longest.

Take care.   

You're welcome, Chilli, a pleasure. Tony Beesley's tomes are a good addition to a mod bibliography, though I found them quite uneven tbh, not a patch on Smiler's book, that's for sure.

Take care you too, my friend.  :)

I've known Tony since the mid-80s; he only lives a couple of miles from me; and in fact there's a few photos of me included in what I think was his first book - Our Generation - so I've got a soft spot for his books  ;).  You're right though, whilst his research seems to have been painstaking, the quality of his writing isn't consistent across the piece.

Unfortunately, Smiler's book is one gap in my library that I've so far been unable to fill, so I'm still on the lookout for a reasonably priced copy. N.B. scrap that - I've just looked on Amazon and they've got copies so I've order one  ;D

God knows when I'll get round to reading that one though :o

Congrats, Chilli, you're in for a treat! Now you should sneak Smiler's book to the top of your list, it's that good. An often made comparison that's totally bang on, IMO, suggests that Richard Barnes' "Mods" is the Old Testament while Paul's book would be the New Testament on original mods.

I see what you did there; the Mod's bible = Old testament, the 'New Religion' = New Testament; bravo  ;D ;D

As for Cosgrove's other publications; I don't know how I'm going to tell the missus that we need a bigger bookcase  ;D

Feel your pain, my friend, but somehow you'll manage it  ;)

Well, Smiler's book arrived yesterday, so I've taken your advice Rafa and put Detroit 67 back on the bookshelf for a short while (I'd not actually started reading it yet anyway) and made a start yesterday evening on 'The New Religion'.  With this kind of book, I always like to have a quick flick through before I actually start reading to get a 'feel' for the book; layout, presentation, range of graphics/pictures etc. and it certainly looks very professionally produced. It reminds me a little bit of the layout of Terry Rawlings book 'Mod - A Very British Phenomenon', which is no bad thing in my view.  If the content matches my early impressions of the book I'll be a happy man.

Cheers.   

greenstreet

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Re: RSG
« Reply #31 on: September 25, 2020, 11:09:08 AM »
Just got my hands on it. First impression: heavy!  ;D


Gyms still closed in Spain?

Nae excuse - get liftin' the book.

I think I'll read it first, Laird, it also looks quite interesting  :)

This is another recent purchase that I've not got round to looking through yet, though it will have to join the queue behind the Stuart Cosgrove trilogy of soul-related books; Detroit 67, Memphis 68 and Harlem 69 which are waiting patiently on the bookshelf waiting to be read. 

Anyone read these; I'm hoping they're worth it, though they have had good reviews whenever I've seen any.

I've read the Detroit book, Chilli, and I have to say it lived up to expectations: a wonderful, thorough research work blended with an articulate narrative, which is the standard essays should aim to, IMO.

As you should expect, it's heavy on Motown but provides also a lot of context about the Motor City and the era, including the involvement of John Sinclair's White Panthers Party with black nationalist groups and the civil right struggles. In fact, I'm planning to read the rest of the trilogy some day soon.

As for the RSG tome, after savouring it for a couple of hours, I think the cover's claims to be the "definitive story" are quite accurate, with attention to detail very much to the fore (Andy Neill conducted literally hundreds of interviews during the 17 years that it took to ready -no pun intended- the book, and it shows), loads of great pictures of the show and its contributors, even pieces about the show by frequent guests as Mick Jagger. Probably the book of the year for people of our persuassion.

Thanks for your succinct summary of both books Rafa; as always, very helpful.

I seem to have been on a bit of buying binge this year and managed to read two of Tony Beesley's books over the summer; Sawdust Caesars and Mojo Talkin', both of which are fairly hefty reads.  The downside now is finding the time to fit in reading time for everything else, though I'm definitely going to prioritise the Cosgrove trilogy as I've had these the longest.

Take care.   

You're welcome, Chilli, a pleasure. Tony Beesley's tomes are a good addition to a mod bibliography, though I found them quite uneven tbh, not a patch on Smiler's book, that's for sure.

Take care you too, my friend.  :)

I've known Tony since the mid-80s; he only lives a couple of miles from me; and in fact there's a few photos of me included in what I think was his first book - Our Generation - so I've got a soft spot for his books  ;).  You're right though, whilst his research seems to have been painstaking, the quality of his writing isn't consistent across the piece.

Unfortunately, Smiler's book is one gap in my library that I've so far been unable to fill, so I'm still on the lookout for a reasonably priced copy. N.B. scrap that - I've just looked on Amazon and they've got copies so I've order one  ;D

God knows when I'll get round to reading that one though :o

Congrats, Chilli, you're in for a treat! Now you should sneak Smiler's book to the top of your list, it's that good. An often made comparison that's totally bang on, IMO, suggests that Richard Barnes' "Mods" is the Old Testament while Paul's book would be the New Testament on original mods.

I see what you did there; the Mod's bible = Old testament, the 'New Religion' = New Testament; bravo  ;D ;D

As for Cosgrove's other publications; I don't know how I'm going to tell the missus that we need a bigger bookcase  ;D

Feel your pain, my friend, but somehow you'll manage it  ;)

Well, Smiler's book arrived yesterday, so I've taken your advice Rafa and put Detroit 67 back on the bookshelf for a short while (I'd not actually started reading it yet anyway) and made a start yesterday evening on 'The New Religion'.  With this kind of book, I always like to have a quick flick through before I actually start reading to get a 'feel' for the book; layout, presentation, range of graphics/pictures etc. and it certainly looks very professionally produced. It reminds me a little bit of the layout of Terry Rawlings book 'Mod - A Very British Phenomenon', which is no bad thing in my view.  If the content matches my early impressions of the book I'll be a happy man.

Cheers.   

Please, tell us your impressions when you finish it, I'm interested in knowing your thoughts. 

Chilli

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Re: RSG
« Reply #32 on: September 25, 2020, 12:08:40 PM »
Just got my hands on it. First impression: heavy!  ;D


Gyms still closed in Spain?

Nae excuse - get liftin' the book.

I think I'll read it first, Laird, it also looks quite interesting  :)

This is another recent purchase that I've not got round to looking through yet, though it will have to join the queue behind the Stuart Cosgrove trilogy of soul-related books; Detroit 67, Memphis 68 and Harlem 69 which are waiting patiently on the bookshelf waiting to be read. 

Anyone read these; I'm hoping they're worth it, though they have had good reviews whenever I've seen any.

I've read the Detroit book, Chilli, and I have to say it lived up to expectations: a wonderful, thorough research work blended with an articulate narrative, which is the standard essays should aim to, IMO.

As you should expect, it's heavy on Motown but provides also a lot of context about the Motor City and the era, including the involvement of John Sinclair's White Panthers Party with black nationalist groups and the civil right struggles. In fact, I'm planning to read the rest of the trilogy some day soon.

As for the RSG tome, after savouring it for a couple of hours, I think the cover's claims to be the "definitive story" are quite accurate, with attention to detail very much to the fore (Andy Neill conducted literally hundreds of interviews during the 17 years that it took to ready -no pun intended- the book, and it shows), loads of great pictures of the show and its contributors, even pieces about the show by frequent guests as Mick Jagger. Probably the book of the year for people of our persuassion.

Thanks for your succinct summary of both books Rafa; as always, very helpful.

I seem to have been on a bit of buying binge this year and managed to read two of Tony Beesley's books over the summer; Sawdust Caesars and Mojo Talkin', both of which are fairly hefty reads.  The downside now is finding the time to fit in reading time for everything else, though I'm definitely going to prioritise the Cosgrove trilogy as I've had these the longest.

Take care.   

You're welcome, Chilli, a pleasure. Tony Beesley's tomes are a good addition to a mod bibliography, though I found them quite uneven tbh, not a patch on Smiler's book, that's for sure.

Take care you too, my friend.  :)

I've known Tony since the mid-80s; he only lives a couple of miles from me; and in fact there's a few photos of me included in what I think was his first book - Our Generation - so I've got a soft spot for his books  ;).  You're right though, whilst his research seems to have been painstaking, the quality of his writing isn't consistent across the piece.

Unfortunately, Smiler's book is one gap in my library that I've so far been unable to fill, so I'm still on the lookout for a reasonably priced copy. N.B. scrap that - I've just looked on Amazon and they've got copies so I've order one  ;D

God knows when I'll get round to reading that one though :o

Congrats, Chilli, you're in for a treat! Now you should sneak Smiler's book to the top of your list, it's that good. An often made comparison that's totally bang on, IMO, suggests that Richard Barnes' "Mods" is the Old Testament while Paul's book would be the New Testament on original mods.

I see what you did there; the Mod's bible = Old testament, the 'New Religion' = New Testament; bravo  ;D ;D

As for Cosgrove's other publications; I don't know how I'm going to tell the missus that we need a bigger bookcase  ;D

Feel your pain, my friend, but somehow you'll manage it  ;)

Well, Smiler's book arrived yesterday, so I've taken your advice Rafa and put Detroit 67 back on the bookshelf for a short while (I'd not actually started reading it yet anyway) and made a start yesterday evening on 'The New Religion'.  With this kind of book, I always like to have a quick flick through before I actually start reading to get a 'feel' for the book; layout, presentation, range of graphics/pictures etc. and it certainly looks very professionally produced. It reminds me a little bit of the layout of Terry Rawlings book 'Mod - A Very British Phenomenon', which is no bad thing in my view.  If the content matches my early impressions of the book I'll be a happy man.

Cheers.   

Please, tell us your impressions when you finish it, I'm interested in knowing your thoughts.

Oh I definitely will, though it might take me a little while to complete it because I can currently only commit to about an hour at most at the end of the day, and that probably won't be every day either, and having had that quick skim through yesterday evening, it looks like there's a lot for me to get through  ;) 

greenstreet

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Re: RSG
« Reply #33 on: September 25, 2020, 06:37:09 PM »
Savour it, my friend, don't hurry

The Laird of Enfield

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Re: RSG
« Reply #34 on: September 26, 2020, 12:01:46 AM »

Cosgrove is a great writer and per his radio show , his knowledge of football is immense.  Of course with the Cassius book coming out , perhaps his sporting knowledge goes way beyond the confines of mere fitba. 

Thanks fur the heads up , big fella. .


Ye ever read his Hampden Babylon book?




Based on Kenneth Anger's infamous Hollywood Babylon, this work takes a celebratory journey through the back streets of sex and scandal in the Scottish game, providing a popular romp through the lives of the losers, boozers and substance abusers that populate the nation's sport.


Surely been enough new material since then tae justify a new/updated edition.


greenstreet

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Re: RSG
« Reply #35 on: September 26, 2020, 10:59:49 AM »



Surely been enough new material since then tae justify a new/updated edition.

 ;D